Kore Infrastructure Completes 1-Year Demonstration Of Its Waste-To-Energy System

Kore Infrastructure Completes 1-Year Demonstration Of Its Waste-To-Energy System - Carbon Herald
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The US-based waste-to-energy company Kore Infrastructure moves forward with the development of its emissions reduction technology. It announces on October 20th that it successfully completed a one-year demonstration of its waste-to-energy modular system at its Los Angeles facility. 

The facility is producing 100% renewable energy from organic waste via a closed-loop, carbon-negative process. The process starts with entering feedstock like agriculture residue, organic waste from landfills, or construction debris into the hopper. 

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The modular system uses a pyrolysis process that heats the feedstock under high temperatures exceeding 1000°F (537°C) in a zero-oxygen environment. The biomass is then converted into a gas consisting of hydrogen, CO2, methane, and carbon monoxide. 

The process also produces fixed carbon called biocarbon. A ton of feedstock produces around 400 pounds (181kg) of biocarbon that can be used as a soil amendment. 

The hydrogen also made from Kore’s system is called UltraGreen hydrogen™ and can be used to decarbonize a variety of industrial applications like steel manufacturing and ammonia production. It can also be upgraded for fuel-cell electric cars, trucks, buses, and trains.

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According to Cornelius Shields, CEO and founder of Kore Infrastructure the successful demonstration of the modular system proves Kore’s technology is commercially-ready and able to scale up to solve the twin problems of reducing waste and increasing access to clean, carbon-negative fuels.

“Our technology is now available to waste, energy, and transportation sector leaders to provide a Made-in-America, carbon-negative energy solution, creating a supply chain that is emissions-free, sustainable, and affordable,” he added.

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